Tag Archives: Aesop Fables

Top Aesop Stories Every Kid Should Read

Aesop's Fables

Aesop’s Fables have been a traditionally popular collection of simple stories that convey moral values, supposedly written by Aesop, a slave and storyteller in ancient Greece between 620 and 564 BCE. Even in the modern era, the stories do not lose their appeal as their messages are timeless. Here is a top pick of stories that are sure to enthrall your toddlers.

1. The Lion & the Mouse

This is the story of a lion that was disturbed by a mouse. Angered, the lion threatened to kill the mouse, but the mouse said that if he was released he would repay the lion one day. Amused, the lion freed him. One day, the lion was caught in a hunter’s net, and the mouse rescued him by chewing on the net and opening it.

The moral, of course, is that good deeds will always be rewarded.

2. The Fox & the Grapes

One day a fox saw a bunch of juicy grapes. He was badly tempted to get them. He jumped multiple times, with all his might, but the grapes were simply out of his reach. Finally, giving up, the fox said scornfully, “Why am I trying so hard to get them? They are so sour.”

The moral is that people belittle that which is unattainable for them.

3. The ant and the dove

Once a dove saw an ant fall into a stream. The ant was struggling and was sure to drown. The dove took pity on the ant, and dropped a blade of grass next to him. Clinging to the blade of grass, the ant floated safely to the bank of the stream. Soon after, the dove was spotted by a hunter. Just as the hunter took aim with his gun, the ant stung him on his feet. Yelping in pain, the hunter missed his aim, and the dove flew safely away.

The moral is that kindness is always rewarded in one way or the other.

4. The thirsty crow

It was very dry season, and all the wells and streams dried up. Birds began to die, having no water to drink. A thirsty crow, searching for water, found a pitcher with very little water in it. However, because of the tall pitcher’s narrow neck, the crow could not reach the water. Then an idea occurred to him. He picked some pebbles and dropped into the pitcher one by one. Slowly but surely, the water level in the pitcher came up, and the crow could drink his fill.

The moral of the story is that one should use his wits in dire situations.

5. Who will bell the cat?

One day, all the mice got together and discussed a very serious matter that endangered their lives every single moment of their lives. There was a cat in the vicinity that threatened to catch them any moment. The mice wanted to find a solution to the problem. They thought that if there was some way of knowing that the cat was coming, they could simply run away. A young mouse suggested the idea that a bell should be hung around the cat’s neck. As the cat moved, the bell would surely ring, and the mice could run away. All the mice thought it was a great idea. Then an old mouse stood up and said, “The idea is very good, but who will bell the cat?”

The moral of the story is that it is easy to suggest great ideas, but implementing them is not so easy.

6. The oak and the reeds

A giant oak stood near a shallow stream in which a host of reeds grew. When the wind blew, the oak stood tall and strong, but the reeds bent low. The mighty oak said scornfully, “I pity you. You have to bow to the slightest breeze while I can stand strong in mighty winds.” The reeds knew better. They said, “We bow low so that we will not break. You who cannot bow, are easy to break if a strong wind blows.” Sure enough, a great hurricane blew, and the oak fell at once, torn by the roots.

 The moral of the story is that it is wise to yield when it is folly to resist.

7. The dog and his reflection

A dog was rushing home with a bone that he had been given by a butcher. On the way home, he had to cross a narrow brook. As the dog looked down from the bridge at the water, he saw his reflection. However, the foolish dog thought that it was another dog with a bone. Greedy to get one more bone, the dog barked loudly and jumped into the water. Having lost his own bone, and finding no dog in the water, the foolish dog somehow managed to swim to the shore.

The moral of the story is that greed makes one foolish.